17 Fruits and Veggies to Eat this Winter

Read on to learn about some of the unexpected vitamin-rich cold-weather foods you should stock up on right now.

Cool Climates

1. Cabbage
  • Peak Season: While some strains of cabbage are available starting in July, most varieties love cool weather and are ready for harvest through the fall and winter.
  • Storage Tips: Tightly wrap individual heads of cabbage in plastic and stash in the refrigerator to keep ‘em fresh for up to a week.
  • How to Eat It: Cabbage’s nutritional benefits are most pronounced when raw, so slice up a few leaves to add crunch to salads or stir fries.
2. Brussels Sprouts
  • Peak Season: September through February
  • Storage Tips: Brussels sprouts will keep in the fridge for a few weeks. The outer leaves will shrivel, so remove them just before cooking your sprouts.
  • How to Eat It: Toss halved sprouts with olive oil and roast until crispy and brown. Top with a light coating of brown butter and sage for a decadent (but still healthy) side dish.
3. Winter Squash
  • Peak Season: Winter squash hit the markets around late September and stick around through early March.
  • Storage Tips: Even though they seem pretty solid, squash continue to ripen once they’re picked. Slow down the process by storing them in a cool, slightly humid environment (like, say, a basement or cellar). Under the right conditions, squash will keep for up to three months.
  • How to Eat It: Since squash is healthy, fairly inexpensive, filling, and darn tasty, it’s no wonder there are thousands of awesome recipes for them. Get started with these five delicious dishes.
4. Potatoes
  • Peak Season: Various varieties of potatoes are available year-round.
  • Storage Tips: Store potatoes in a dark, cool, well-ventilated area for about one month. Keep spuds away from onions and apples. At room temperature, potatoes will keep for one to two weeks.
  • How to Eat It: Try a healthier take on the classic baked potato bar. Twice-baked spuds stuffed with kale, broccoli, and cheddar make for a tasty and comforting meal.
5. Onions
  • Peak Season: Various types of onions are available all year round.
  • Storage Tips: Stash onions outside the fridge (they can go soft if refrigerated) in a cool, dry place for several months.
  • How to Eat It: Sautéed white onion jazzes up this fig, ricotta, and arugula flatbread pizza.
6. Beets
  • Peak Season: Beets are available early spring through late fall.
  • Storage Tips: Store beet roots in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to a month.
  • How to Eat It: Toss roasted beets and carrots with lentils and plenty of fresh herbs and spices to make a hearty, healthy vegetarian main dish.
7. Celeriac
  • Peak Season: September through March.
  • Storage Tips: Like other root veggies, celeriac will stay fresh in the fridge for up to a month.
  • How to Eat It: Sub in celeriac for almost any root vegetable. Cube and sautée it for a tasty, healthy substitute for hash browns.
8. Carrots
  • Peak Season: Available through late fall, although some varieties are harvested through the winter.
  • Storage Tips: Like many root vegetables, carrots will keep in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for several weeks.
  • How to Eat It: Bring out carrots’ natural sweetness with a side dish that combines the orange veggies, cinnamon, orange juice, and maple syrup.
9. Turnips and Rutabagas
  • Peak Season: Available all winter long.
  • Storage Tips: Keep turnips and rutabagas in the fridge for a few weeks or in a root cellar for several months.
  • How to Eat It: What’s cheesy, gooey, and surprisingly good for you? A lightened-up simple turnip gratin! Rutabagas can be subbed in for any dish that calls for turnips.
10. Parsnips
  • Peak Season: Parsnips are at their best in the late fall and early spring.
  • Storage Tips: Store parsnips in a bag in the refrigerator for three to four weeks.
  • How to Eat It: Combine roasted parsnips with Granny Smith apples (and a few other essential ingredients) for a smooth, fall-flavored soup.
11. Sweet Potatoes
  • Peak Season: Sweet potatoes are available year-round, but they’re best in the fall.
  • Storage Tips: Keep sweet potatoes in a cool, dry place outside the refrigerator for up to two weeks.
  • How to Eat It: It wouldn’t be fair to pick one of these 45 sweet potato recipes and not try the rest. Pro tip: Sweet potato brownies are a thing.
12. Radicchio
  • Peak Season: There are three main varieties of radicchio available in the U.S., Chiogga, Treviso, and Tardivo. Tardivo radicchio is available throughout the winter.
  • Storage Tips: Keep it in the refrigerator wrapped in plastic for up to three weeks.
  • How to Eat It: Sautéed radicchio adds a kick (and a nice serving of vitamins and minerals) to this easy pasta dish.

Warm Climates 

13. Citrus Fruit
14. Pomegranates
  • Peak Season: The globe-shaped fruits are in season from October through January.
  • Storage Tips: Keep pomegranates in the refrigerator for up to two months, or at room temperature for one to two weeks.
  • How to Eat It: A sprinkling of pomegranate seeds adds some tart, bright flavor to a winter kale salad.
15. Dark, Leafy Greens
  • Peak Season: Kale is grown in warmer climates and the Pacific Northwest throughout the winter months.
  • Storage Tips: Wrap washed and dried greens in paper towels, then put the whole shebang in a plastic bag in the fridge. Greens will stay fresh for one or two weeks.
  • How to Eat It: Swap kale, chard, or collards for lettuce to make a nutrient-rich salad.
16. Escarole
  • Peak Season: Escarole grows through fall and early winter in warmer climates.
  • Storage Tips: This dainty green is a bit delicate, so eat it up quickly. Wrapped in paper towels and stored in an open plastic bag, escarole keeps in the refrigerator for up to four days.
  • How to Eat It: Escarole adds some bright-green freshness to a classic Italian soup.
17. Fennel
  • Peak Season: Fennel is available at the market from late fall through early spring.
  • Storage Tips: Wrap fennel bulb in a paper bag and store in the refrigerator for up to five days.
  • How to Eat It: Yes, it’s possible to make a crisp, totally fresh salad during the winter. Try this fennel and celery dish for a crunchy cold-weather lunch.

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